Autopilot – schizotypy driving

So I’ve mentioned my autopilot quite a few times. And with good reason. It’s the thing that lets me have a relatively normal life. But it’s also the thing that makes it difficult for me to get help when I need it. Most people have them, we would go nuts without them as our brains can’t handle the vast amounts of  information we’re experiencing every minute. But it’s a fine balance.  Here are a few pros and cons of having an autopilot in my life.

Autopilot Good

  • Makes it difficult for people around me to see that I have schizotypal personality disorder, not too fond of preconceptions within the area.
  • Lets me do lots of things without thinking about them, and in a seemingly normal way. Not cognitively difficult tasks, but simple things.

Autopilot Bad

  • Makes it difficult for people around me to see that I have schizotypal personality disorder, meaning that my close family have a hard time seeing the danger signals and knowing when things are bad and I need some help getting help. Because for me it’s seldomly bad enough and it’s down prioritized in a busy life with job, kid, social life etc. Which is not good. I’m not great at putting my own priorities first.
  • When all everyday things just work out, I take on too many projects. That stresses me. And like sleep deprivation, stress triggers schizotypal symptoms to escalate.

So like many things, it’s complex. You need it, and then you don’t want it to take over too much. And like many things, awareness changes a lot. Being aware of my autopilot makes me more aware of my symptoms, and just that reflection in itself helps me to me more aware of my situation in general and take better care of myself.

 

 


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